IT IS NOT ALWAYS MALARIA AND TYPHOID

Mr. A was not feeling well. He had fever, headache, body pains and a poor appetite. He assumed it was malaria and typhoid, ran to the nearest medicine vendor (chemist) and demanded for ‘malaria and typhoid medicine’. He took the medications and still didn’t feel better. Once again, he assumed the drugs were not working, he opted for injections for his supposed illness but he just grew weaker and weaker until he was taken to the hospital.

Miss D just was feeling ‘somehow’ during the day; she ran to the nearest medicine vendor and asked for some antibiotics to ‘flush her system’. She requested for a particular brand she was used to as she claimed it makes her feel better. Few weeks later, Miss D had a burning sensation after urination along with some smelly discharge. She asked a friend of hers who directed her to insert garlic into her vagina, but she got worse. She was rushed to the hospital a few days later and was found to be resistant to most of the appropriate antibiotics that were required to treat her.

When we are sick (especially because of our environment), we conclude that it is ‘malaria and typhoid fever’, and we self-medicate. It is important to see a medical personnel before using certain medications especially antibiotics. You can visit the nearest hospital, primary health center, medical laboratory, or community pharmacy for proper diagnosis and management.

It may not be malaria, typhoid fever or whatever you think it might be. Sometimes, all you need is a little rest, healthy meals, some exercise, or lifestyle modifications.

  • When we have fever, we can take over-the-counter medicines like paracetamol for one or two days.
  • We should visit the nearest health centers for proper diagnosis and management.
  • Listen to the advice of your healthcare provider.
  • Confirm the legitimacy of the advice you get from friends and family from health professionals before you put such information to action.
  • Adopt a healthy lifestyle to improve your health.